News & Insights

Building Black-Owned Business in Baltimore

The protests engulfing the country over the last month have not only raised overdue awareness of the criminal justice system, but that they are just a symptom of the legacy of government policies and institutional practices that have advanced and perpetuated racial inequality. As a Baltimore-based law firm, we have reflected on ways that we…

Don’t Hold Your Breath: Understanding the IRS Whistleblower Reward Program Can Prevent Substantial Financial Consequences

Article effective based on date written: July 7, 2020 While the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) has long had a Whistleblower Office, the past few years have seen an uptick in the numbers of claims filed with the Office.  In 2019 alone, according to an annual report from the IRS, the agency made awards exceeding $120…

Avoiding Conflicts of Interest: Lessons Learned from the UMMS-Healthy Holly Scandal

June 2020 marked a critical milepost in Catherine Pugh’s long road to redemption. On June 19, the disgraced former mayor of Baltimore pleaded guilty to a state misdemeanor perjury charge for her failure to disclose her business interest in her self-published “Healthy Holly” books as a state senator. And on June 26, Pugh began a…

Collection: Tax Collection and the Coronavirus: What Happens After the Pandemic?

This article was originally published in the Journal of Tax Practice and Procedure, Volume 22, Issue 2. I. Introduction The coronavirus (“COVID-19”) has touched all our lives in a profound way. For the first time, we are experiencing stay in place orders, mandatory closing of nonessential businesses and extended periods of time in quarantine. The…

My Business Is In Bankruptcy: Can It Get A PPP Loan Or Not?

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Congress enacted a Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) under which businesses adversely impacted by the pandemic may obtain loans from the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) and use the proceeds to pay payroll and certain other operating expenses.  If the businesses use the loan proceeds for approved purposes and satisfy certain other criteria for retaining employees, the loans are forgiven.  If the loans are not forgiven, they must be repaid, albeit at a favorable interest rate.

June 19, 2020: Reflections on American and Baltimore History

I write to you today to recognize and pay respect to an important moment in American history. Friday, June 19th, or “Juneteenth,” represents the 155th anniversary of the occasion most commonly celebrated to commemorate the abolition of slavery – on that date in 1865, Union Army soldiers landed at Galveston, Texas, with the news that enslaved…

Raising Capital Post-COVID-19 – What Now?

Right about now, many business owners are asking themselves – what’s next?  How can I sustain my business?  Where can I obtain additional financing?  What if I need quick access to capital?  Am I out of options? Maybe your business received federal, state, or local government financial assistance in response to the crisis.  Maybe you…

Seven Rosenberg Martin Greenberg Partners Ranked by Chambers USA in 2020

Rosenberg Martin Greenberg proudly announces that the firm and seven of its partners – Benjamin Rosenberg, Barry Greenberg, Gerard Martin, Stanley Fine, Cynthia Spell, Gerard Gaeng and Caroline Hecker – have been ranked in the 2020 edition of Chambers USA as among Maryland’s leading lawyers in the areas of commercial litigation, white-collar crime & government…

My Deal Was Approved By High-Ranking Government Officials How Can I Not Have a Binding Contract?

Parties entering into contracts with corporations, limited liability companies, and other legal entities often require proof, in the form of resolutions by the board of directors or members authorizing an identified officer to sign the contract on behalf of the entity, that a contract signed by that officer will bind the entity.  In the absence…

“No Harm, No Foul:” Suit to Set Aside Foreclosure Sale for Failure to Comply With Deed of Trust Doomed By Failure to Allege That Compliance Would Have Changed Outcome

“No Harm, No Foul:” Suit to Set Aside Foreclosure Sale for Failure to Comply With Deed of Trust Doomed By Failure to Allege That Compliance Would Have Changed Outcome

The opinion of the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals in Young-Allen v. Bank of America provides both hope for lenders frustrated by borrowers who delay inevitable foreclosure sales by requiring the lender to comply with every applicable pre-foreclosure requirement and guidance for borrowers seeking to hold lenders to such requirements.